Colorado

Denveright: A Community Planning for Process for Denver’s Next 15 Years

Denveright_1

Denveright is a community-driven process for shaping Denver’s future over the next 15 years. The first public session was held this morning at McNichols Civic Center Building in Denver.

Open to the public, the Denveright sessions seek strong community involvement. Planning focuses on four key areas: land use, mobility, parks, and recreational resources.

Brad Buchanan, Executive Director, Community Planning and Development at City and County of Denver, opened the session. Buchanan introduced the opportunities for creating a bright and sustainable future.

Brad Buchanan, Executive Director, Community Planning and Development at City and County of Denver, opened the session. Buchanan introduced the opportunities for creating a bright and sustainable future.

Jay Renkens, Principal & Director of Denver Area Operations at the architectural and planning firm MIG, reviewed Denver's previous planning successes and outlined the current planning process.

Jay Renkens, Principal & Director of Denver Area Operations at the architectural and planning firm MIG, reviewed Denver's previous planning successes and outlined the current planning process.

Phase 1, the Kick Off, is currently underway. The process will extend to Phase 4, Documentation and Adoption, in the winter of 2018.

Phase 1, the Kick Off, is currently underway. The process will extend to Phase 4, Documentation and Adoption, in the winter of 2018.

Denveright encourages you to Get Involved. The schedule of upcoming meeting is here.

John Oró, MD

 

"Change agent" Mike Biselli on reimagining healthcare

With the Denver skyline in the background, Mike Biselli pushes the digital health vision forward at the March 2015 Prime Health Meetup at Taxi.

With the Denver skyline in the background, Mike Biselli pushes the digital health vision forward at the March 2015 Prime Health Meetup at Taxi.

Recently interviewed by Innovation News, Mike Biselli on Colorado’s digital health ecosystem and reimaging healthcare:

I firmly believe the “dam is about to break” and with that will be incredible transformation for the healthcare industry! I’m continually humbled and inspired to be recognized across the country as a “change agent” for healthcare; we desperately need to reignite this ailing industry, and I have no trepidation with challenging the status quo! That’s what keeps me so interested and excited!

Read the interview at Innovation News.
Follow PaleoTerran on Twitter at twitter.com/paleoterran

The grandeur of North America’s Great Sand Dunes

Among the Earth’s many fascinating nooks and crannies, Great Sands Dunes National Park & Preserve stands apart for its rugged grandeur. Hugging the eastern edge of the Sangre de Cristo Mountain Range in southern Colorado, this 330 square-mile dune field contains the tallest sand dunes in North America. Protected as a national monument in 1932, this wondrous landscape became the Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve in 2004.

The extensive volume of sand comprising this park is believed to have originated in a vast lake, which was formed from glacial runoff at the end of the last ice age. As this lake dried, forceful winds picked up the sand that was left behind and deposited it along the eastern edge of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, where it accumulated over thousands of years.

These days drivers entering the Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve along its southern access are regularly astonished by the vista that greets them. Among its hundreds of dunes, five stand over 700 feet tall and more than thirty tower upwards of 600 feet. Hiking the Great Sand Dunes, either the smaller dunes at the edge of the park or one of the taller dunes, is an activity not to be missed. A round trip hike from the Dunes Parking Lot to the giant High Dune should last no more than two hours. And a 6-mile round trip hike to the colossal Star Dune will generally take around five hours.

Epic, almost surreal in their grandeur, the Great Sand Dunes stand as a testament to the mighty forces of nature, showing us how over time wind and water can build breath-taking mountains from the tiniest of stones. We’re fortunate to possess such a reminder of the power of nature and the fragility of its works, the appreciation of which may reveal to us anew the delicate beauty of this world in which we live.

John Oró, MD

Outdoors: Mt. Bierstadt, August 2012

DSC_0005.jpeg

Intermittent foot paths allow passage through the "dreaded willows." Bierstadt's peak, in the upper right, as seen in the morning light. 

On Saturday August 21, my wife and two of my sons and I hiked 14,060 ft. Mt. Bierstadt. For my wife and my youngest son, the goal was their first 14er. For my oldest son, his third ascent up Bierstadt, it was to support us while enjoying the outdoors and physical activity. My first climb of Bierstadt (also with my oldest son) was in August 2010, just one month before a cycling crash down Squaw Pass. Thus, my prime motivation was to see if I was back to baseline and could climb it again. 

DSC_0006.jpeg

Nearby lake on left side of trail. 

DSC_0039.jpeg

Hiking together at the higher altitudes. 

Taking a break before the final push. People on the summit are barely seen as faint linear images on crest in the right upper corner.

DSC_0042.jpeg

View from the other side of the mountain.

DSC_0049.jpeg

At the summit. 

DSC_0054.jpeg

The path down. The parking lot is beyond the lake seen in the left upper quadrant.

There may be another reason for the adults to climb, recently expressed nicely by Mark Sisson:

The comfortable plateau we’ve achieved – with all good intention – can seem less satisfying. Where did the peaks of life go? Do we make space for exuberance or adventure anymore? In seeking to live vitally, we inherently value more than the necessities of survival, more than the elements of comfort. It’s a mark of thriving, I think, to test the scale and dimension of existence – in whatever way fulfills us personally. We can choose to prioritize the role of awe, adventure, and uncertainty in our lives. The fact is, the power of intermittent euphoria (IE) can fill a deep – and deeply human – well.

Mark's Daily Apple

Terra: Western wildfires & help for children

uswest_omp_2012178.png

Numerous raging wildfires and possible dust events spread a pall of smoke over much of the western and midwestern United States.

NASA Earth Obervatory

And, this from the Early Childhood Team, Office of Lt. Governor Garcia:

The wildfires are currently affecting many Colorado residents, including young children.  We like to direct those interested in donating and volunteering to, www.HelpColoradoNow.org.  In addition, the following materials provide information on how to help children during this stressful time:

    Talking to Children About Wildfires and Other Natural Disasters

    Helping Children After a Wildfire: Tips for Parents and Teachers

    Trauma related to wildfires

    Save the Children: Disaster Support for Children

    Images: Ranch in Tabernash, Colorado

    These images are from an overnight stay, during the Memorial Day weekend, at a ranch in Tabernash located about 1 1/2 hours north of Denver. It was time for my wife, youngest son, and I to get out of the city and slow down. When I awoke Sunday morning, sunlight already filled the valley. Taking my camera with me, I walked to the stables to find them mostly empty. I headed back down the road.

    Looking back at the ranch house, I noted a cowgirl on her horse carrying small yellow flag on the end of a thin pole. She eventually went out of view around the edge of a small hill. Again, I walked back down the gravel road to visit another part of the ranch, but turned in time to see her return with the horses. (To get the whole picture, sometimes you have to look back.)